Wednesday, June 20, 2012

Swayin' While Prayin'

When I pray
I sway.
Why? you may say.

The Yiddish word: shuckle.
Is there a Hebrew equivalent?

It's how I saw people praying growing up.
I don't know another way.
I've tried to stop.
Can't.
It happens by itself.
Side-to-side.
Forth/back.

Sometimes, the emotion of my words gets into my body and takes over.
Or, I'm thinking about my grocery list (oy!).
Then, the sway/pray wakes me up.

Shake!  Awake!
Think about where you are. (Not Heinen's.)

Are you not ashamed
to be swaying
like a saint
when your mind
grows faint?

Close your eyes.
Sway.  Be silent.  Let your body remind your heart.
To listen.
Take part.
Engage.
Be on the same page.
Be one:
Words.  Mind.  Heart. Body.
Sway, and pray.
Or: pray, and sway.

Either way.
14 comments

14 comments:

  1. Sruly Koval - the proud hubby!June 20, 2012 at 11:09 AM

    Love it!

    ReplyDelete
  2. One of the reasons for why we sway when we pray is because it is said that our neshama ( soul ) is compared to a flame, and a flame is always moving around. When we pray, we are connecting with our soul...hence the swaying....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is beautiful - I never heard that.

      Delete
    2. I can't remember for sure where I read it, but I think it's from Rigshei Lev, By Rabbi Nissel, but not 100% sure.

      Delete
  3. the source for that is in the Book of Tanya

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  4. The source for that is in the Book of Tanya

    ReplyDelete
  5. כל עצמותי תאמרנה ה' מי כמוך
    Translation: All My limbs will say: G-d, who is like you?
    Psalms 35:10
    When we 'shuckle', we accomplish this by involving all of our limbs in our prayer.
    Absolutely beautiful writing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Great info/source. Thanks!

      Delete
  6. Poetry on a Jewish blog! My life is complete.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Recent neurological studies have shown that moving when learning increases retention. So shuckling is good for the brain as well!

    ReplyDelete

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